A church under wraps II

From Sue…

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

As we opened the door into St Kentigern’s church, it was fairly obvious we had picked the wrong time to visit. Not only was the sudden and relative warmth of the building steaming up the camera lens like there was no tomorrow, there was just so much to see… and we were still ‘not with it’ after the weekend’s workshop.

We should have known better, really. With a church on the site for the last fifteen hundred years, there was bound to be a lot of history in there and we were not going to be able to take it all in properly.

Thankfully, after visiting a few hundred of these old churches, we are able to at least document them pretty well without thinking too much… and the research always comes later anyway.

We much prefer to experience both the ancient sites and the churches before delving into…

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Full Circle: The final curtain…

Sue concludes the story of our Penrith weekend

The Silent Eye

On most of our workshop weekends, we offer a ‘greeting of the dawn’ at one of the ancient sites. The winter workshops are perfect for this as the sun rises so much later, but as we are at the mercy of the season, the weather and the time local hotels serve breakfast, these are always optional. Usually we choose a place we would not otherwise get to visit, but this time, really, there was only one place to choose… Castlerigg. The stone circle nestles within a circle of hills and there can be few more spectacular settings for an ancient and sacred site.

Not everyone relishes such an early start, and we had made it clear that this would be a brief visit, just for the dawn… we would be gathering there later to end the official part of the weekend. Nevertheless, almost everyone chose to come and greet the…

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Behind the scenes…

Sue’s lovely summary of what we do each Spring!

The Silent Eye

It is an odd thing to put on a workshop where ritual and drama are mixed. Odd, but old… theatre has its roots in the sacred drama of ancient times. Even the rituals of the Church have a theatrical element, blending light, song, the glamour of embroidered vestments and the fragrance of incense and oil. These things combine to capture the imagination and emotions, lifting the heart and mind above the humdrum cares of the world and turning them towards the greater Light of the spirit.

None of these dramatic elements are strictly necessary. Turning the mind and heart towards the divine, whether in prayer, adoration or meditation, needs no company. The spiritual journey is ultimately one we must take alone…and yet, we may have company along the way.

It is perfectly possible to access the spiritual realms without any help at all, just as it is perfectly possible to…

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A flying visit – Seeing the details

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

It is impossible to walk around Stratford-upon-Avon without noticing its history, its art or its connection to William Shakespeare. Half timbered buildings are, it seems, everywhere. Statues and artistic depictions of the Bard vie with signs bearing his name or allusions to his work… in every conceivable place. There are, however, an awful lot of details that are easy to miss, unless you happen to be looking in the right direction.

Take the theatre, for example. The red brick building dominates the town. At first glance, it seems out of place, but closer inspection shows it to be an Art Deco creation that has evolved over time to incorporate new spaces and a theatre in the round. The 1932 building replaced an earlier edifice that was destroyed by fire. The current building was designed by Elizabeth Scott, and was the first major public space designed by a woman. It is…

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The Bloggers Bash 2017

writerchristophfischer

I had a fantastic time at this year’s Blogger’s Bash. It was such a wonderful experience to meet so many amazing people, who, over five years of me blogging have become a second family to me. Getting to talk to these supportive and all very interesting people in the real world was truly a delight.

We had plenty of time to mingle and exchange ideas, then applaud the worthy winners and listen to some insightful presentations.

I can only urge you to check out the following blogs to see which ones inspire you.  There s so much talent, entertainment and information around.
And I would like to thank the organisers for all their hard work. I hope to see you there next year!

But I Smile Anyway

Shelley Wilson

Willowdot21

Graeme Cumming Dot Net

If Only I Could Read Faster

M J Mallon Author (Kyrosmagica)

BlondeWriteMore

SC Skillman

SaylingAway

A…

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What a WINNER Of A Day! #BloggersBash2017 #SundayBlogShare

But I Smile Anyway...

Well, as you all know, it was the Annual Bloggers Bash Awards today.

What an amazing day!!!!!!

The start for me was trying to carry two bulging bags of cakes to the venue, via train and tube! You’d think that would be a conversation starter, wouldn’t you?

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I got a comment from one of the employees at the tube station when he clocked them, and then as I was sat on the Tube, the man opposite looked at the contents of the bag, and gave me a smile… no mate, you ain’t getting none! These are for my Blogily!

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I arrived, in typical Ritu fashion, an hour early, and settled in the lobby of the venue, ready to catch up on blog posts and comments, when I heard a squeal as the committee arrlved…  Sacha  , His Geoffleship , Ali  and Huggable Hugh! 

And so the day began!

The function room…

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In A Vase On Monday – Simply Heavenly

Eliza Waters

Ages ago, when I was in my late teens, I walked down a sidewalk along a tall wooden fence. I smelled the most heavenly scent and had to know what produced it. I boosted myself up to peer over the top and spread below me was a huge carpet of lily of the valley (Convallaria majalis). I pledged then and there that some day I would have the same.

Today, I have several of my own carpets of lily of the valley, which continue to increase annually. I let it run wild, delighted with its sweet scent for the short time it is in bloom. I fill vases and tuck them all over the house. I fall asleep in a cloud of its deliciousness.

The small creamer pitcher is English Royal Crown Derby, an heirloom once belonging to my mother-in-law.

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In the Garden, who hosts a weekly meme…

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Circles Beyond Time – Between two worlds

The Silent Eye

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A herd of deer were outlined against the far horizon as we followed the path, leading our companions across the moor to where it joins the track that runs above Bar Brook.  The stream gathers the peat-stained water from the moor; feeding the old reservoir, its course divides the ancient lands of the living from the realm of the ancestral dead. The original track upon which we now walked might be from any age, but the wheel ruts and gravel speak of the modern vehicles that have used it and suddenly you feel as if you have been taken out of the story you were living and can now only observe.

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As we walked past the old bridge that crosses the stream, there is a choice of ways. There are many crossing points, but this one seems odd as there is no visible path leading to or from it. A…

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Manannán’s Land Irish Myths of the Sea

Beautiful words and pictures from Ali…

aliisaacstoryteller

Until I moved to Cavan eight years ago, I had always lived within sight or sound of the sea. Every summer I head down to Co Kerry for a few days with friends and the boys. There, we are surrounded by sea, and mountains. I love wide open spaces. Both the sea and the high places provide that.

Being a small island, peoples lives have been dominated by the sea. In mythology, the Danann, the Milesians, and various other races came to Ireland from the sea. According to legend, Ireland had two sea deities: Lir, and Manannán mac Lir, which means ‘son of Lir’, or ‘son of the sea’.

Little is known about Lir; there is a Lir who was father to the four children turned into swans by their jealous stepmother, but it is by no means certain that he is one and the same with the sea-god of…

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